DE SLOAMEY DANCE

DE SLOAMEY DANCE
Song
John B. Hymer
John B. Hymer
Hymer & Kent
The words for this “coon” Salome song were published in “Variety,” Aug. 1, 1908, p.7. The closing line of verse 4 points to the African-American origin of the term “hoochy-coochy.”

Is “Mistah Sime” in the first verse Sime Silverman of Variety? Is “Rush” a first or last name?

The spellings of the dialect vary from line to line: “imiteshuns”/”imitachuns,” “uv”/”of.” The “skeeter bar” refers to mosquito netting, here to be used as a costume.

The reference to France in the last verse no doubt stems from the need for a rhyme with “dance” as much as it does the associations with risque behavior (“dances negleejay”).

If yo’se got a little act
An’ yo’ can’t git any time,
Don’t go an’ lay de blame
On Mistah Rush or Sime.
Th[r]o’ ‘way yo’ clo’es–wear a smile,
Read hist’ry an’ den take a chance;
Git a piece of skeeter bar
An’ go do de Sloamey dance.

If yo’se doin’ imitashuns
An’ can’t git no raise in pay,
Don’t run aroun’ a kickin’
Imitashuns is pass-say.
Lock yo’ wardrobe in de trunk;
Learn a wiggle an’ a prance,
Git a piece of skeeter bar
An’ go do de Sloamey dance.

Unknown acts what ain’t got in
Don’t need to fret an’ worry–
Jes’ say “she dances negleejay”;
You’ll git time in a hurry.
Git a John de Baptist head;
Say yo’se jes’ arrived from France;
Git a piece of skeeter bar
An’ go do de Sloamey dance.

I seed a lady do dat dance
I was kinder disapp’inted,
She didn’t weah much clo’es at all
An’ she sho’ly was loose j’inted,
Dey say its classic–I don’t know,
But from all dat I can see
Dat thing they call de Sloamey dance
Looks like old Hooch-a-Kooch to me.

DE SLOAMEY DANCE