SILENT THE BELLS OF THE MOSQUE

Frederic Clay
W. G. Wills
based on T. Moore’s Lalla Rookh, 1877

[Cf. also I’ll Sing Thee Songs of Araby from Lalla Rookh]

The “bells of the mosque” re-appear in many oriental songs. This may be the first reference to them and perhaps due to the literary influence of Moore the phrase came into popular use.

The “kiosk” (Per. kushk) is a pavilion or palace.

Silent the bells of the Mosque,
In white fleece the moon is a capture,
The nightingales round the Kiosk
Are chiming together in rapture;
Thy slave doth vigil keep,
Sleep, my Sultana, sleep my Sultana,
Thy slave doth vigil keep;
Sleep my Sultana, my Sultana sleep.

Ye eyelids, like buds of white rose,
Oh! which are ye, thinking or dreaming;
Ye red lips that softly unclose,
Would you break into song in soft seeming!
Thy slave doth vigil keep,
Sleep, my Sultana, sleep my Sultana,
Thy slave doth vigil keep;
Sleep my Sultana, my Sultana sleep!

SILENT THE BELLS OF THE MOSQUE